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Meeting ID: 624 153 164

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Meeting ID: 624 153 164

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Abstract

Evaluating diaspora as a process I track the politicization of diasporic organizational field of Ukrainian and Russian organizations in Sweden during late 2013–2016 using social network analysis. I focus specifically on the local levels of analysis in order to uncover the potential mechanisms of decision-making for collaboration among conflict-generated organizations that in turn can lead to organizational network politicization and thus might be connected to mobilization and saturation of diasporic identities. I find that investigating the evolution and changes in the clusters in the collaboration networks as well as an analysis of the specific types of triangles that the new conflict-generated organizations are in contribute to understanding the mechanisms of processes of diasporization in this specific context. In addition, I argue that the conflict-generated organizations can be instrumental in politicizing the organizational field. I suggest that local investigation of their immediate directed ties can shed a better light on the patterns of network politicization, including clustering and polarization.